Wellington boots with arms – photomontage

contemporary surrealist photomontage - wellington boots with arms emerging

Wellington boots with arms
Photomontage. June 2018

A photomontage showing arms emerging from the tops of a pair of wellington boots.
The arms are sinking down into the boots, as though the footware is devouring the owner of the arms. The theme of predatory footwear is one that I’ve explored several times over the past few decades. Another example can be seen here – shoes with teeth.
This photomontage was created while I was exploring various options for creating a sculpture that included wellington boots. I feel that these boots have a strong sculptural presence, and I’m quite surprised how under-represented they are in the field of sculpture.
The image, which I think probably falls into the category of contemporary surrealism, is meant to be both humorous and unsettling.

Shoes with extended laces – photograph

contemporary photography - shoes with their laces extended - slightly sinister

Shoes with extended laces
Photograph. June 2018

This photograph shows a pair of walking boots with their laces extended away from them.
I took the photograph when I noticed the boots on the floor (they are my boots). The laces and the lighting from the window create a strangely unsettling effect, to me at least.
The photo was taken while I was visiting Oban in Scotland – on the same visit as this slightly surreal photograph.
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A surreal alignment of heads

surreal photography - strange alignment of heads

A photograph of two people standing in a way that makes their heads seem to merge in an unsettling and humorous way.
The bizarre, surreal effect of the photograph is enhanced by the uniform bright red background and the colour the clothing. The photograph was taken on a ferry between Oban and the Isle of Mull in Scotland, May 2018.

Anthropomorphism and a kitchen sink

contemporary art anthropomorphism - a sink plug hole that resembles the eye of a cyclops

Anthropomorphic kitchen sink: Photograph: June 2015

A slightly disturbing (to me) photograph of a kitchen sink. The texture of the sink’s surface along with the staining round the plug hole and the shape and position of the overflow give this image an anthropomorphic quality, giving the suggestion that the plug hole may be an eye while the overflow could be a nose or a mouth (or a mixture of both). If this sink does indeed resemble a human face the fact that the face only has one eye in the centre of its head suqqests a cyclops.
The plug hole and overflow can also be seen as being suggestive of other orifices.

Photograph of mundane domestic setting – beans tin in washing-up bowl

Contemporary art photography - mundane domestic situations

 

Photograph: Heinz Beanz tin in washing-up bowl
January 2018

This photograph is from an ongoing series in which I photograph mundane scenes and objects in everyday domestic settings. Other photographs in the series show such things as cup rings on work surfaces, shadows of soap containers cast by lightbulbs.
The photographs are all aesthetically pleasing (to me). One of their purposes is to show beauty in normally overlooked situations.

Fox skull photo

fox-skull-chris-madden-1818

Here’s a photo of a fox’s skull that I took recently.
Nice abstract sculptural quality I think.
I expect the fox would be very pleased to know that its head had been put to such worthwhile use.

Like most of my images on this site, if you want to use the image please contact me, as the images can’t be used without payment. Thanks.

Anthropocentrism and pareidolia – an orchid flower as a human head.

humour in contemporary art - an orchid as a head (pareidolia)

Pareidolia
Photograph with digitally drawn additions. September 2013

A humorous image: a human body drawn onto a photograph of an orchid.
I like this image’s comic/sinister quality.
It’s a work that’s about the way that people interpret the world around them in anthropocentric terms.
The phenomenon of seeing faces where there aren’t any is called pareidolia. I suspect that the condition evolved because for our hunter gatherer ancestors it was very important to be able to see their enemy’s faces hiding in the undergrowth.