Pen and ink drawing from my sketchbook (and from my subconscious)

contemporary art drawing from the subconscious

Pen and ink on paper. Height: 2.5inches/65mm

As an exercise in creativity I make a habit of sitting down occasionally and just drawing whatever comes into my head, giving the process as little thought as possible. I call it “drawing my subconscious”. I do the drawings in pen and ink on paper, usually in a notebook that I reserve specially for the purpose.
This image is a scan of yesterday’s effort, drawn on a sunny afternoon while sitting in a wood full of bluebells in the very pleasant grounds of Hatfield House, a stately home dating back to the reign of Queen Elizabeth I. As you can see, my surroundings had little impact on the workings of my subconscious. Which is a bit worrying.

Spontaneous watercolour sketch

Contemporary art watercolour sketch - spontaneous painting from the unconscious

This watercolour sketch was an exercise in creating something without any preconceived idea about what I was about to create.
It turns our to be a slightly sinister landscape, in the centre of which there is something that may or may not be a living entity. Originally this object looked more like a strangely shaped rock, but the addition of colour to it removed it from the rest of the landscape and turned it into something separate from the landscape. The blue dot in the image, which is just a circle of coloured paper placed on the image, gives the possibly living entity an air of sentience, as it seems to be contemplating a strange sun in the sky.

Umbrellas in contemporary art

contemporary art drawing - umbrella sculpture sketch
A sketch of an idea for a sculpture, showing an umbrella mounted at the top of a conical structure that has short filaments protruding from it.
I have a fascination with umbrellas for some reason. I think it’s possibly due to a mixture of their slightly Heath Robinsonesque mechanical structure – the hinged flexible rods that are levered outwards to support a stretched fabric cover – and their pleasing form when in the open position. Not to mention their practicality.¬†And the fact that they are, despite their mechanical intricacy, very much taken for granted and dismissed as objects of great mundanity.
My first ever published image was an absurdist redesign of the umbrella, published in the Sunday Times in about 1974.