Circles and rays

Contemporary abstract art and science - circles and rays

Circles and rays

Digital. 2022

A print taken from a digital animation of expanding circles and rays.
The work is related to my interest in both art and science, and is inspired by the concept of the expansion of the universe.
I’ve been interested in both art and science most of my life. In fact in my youth (over fifty years ago) my ambition was to be an astronomer. I even constructed my own astronomical telescope, including grinding the parabolic mirror, when I was a teenager.

Abstract radiating lines and spheres

contemporary abstract art radiating lines and spheres

Abstract radiating lines and spheres

Digital print from animation still. 2022.

A print created from a frame from a digital abstract animation.

The abstract animation from which this print is taken consists primarily of brightly coloured repeating forms such as lines, stripes and spheres radiating outwards from the centre. The image here captures a particular moment in the expansion of the composition and has the status of a work in its own right.

The radiating lines and stripes, along with the bright colours, give the work a expansive and positive feel.

Expansion II

Expansion II

Digital animation.  2023

A digital animation composed of layers of expanding and radiating forms.

This work is from a series that explores the generation of complexity from simplicity by the interaction of simple forms to create complex forms.

In the Beginning – rotating grids generating complex patterns

In the Beginning: complex patterns generated from simple patterns.

Abstract digital animation. 2015

This work is a an animation composed of overlapping identical grids of hexagons rotating relative to each other.
The piece works on a similar principal to Moiré patterns, however the results are made more complex by the inclusion of simple computer algorithms that make the patterns in the grids interact with each other so that, for instance, where black areas overlap each other they turn white.The work is a relatively fast and dynamic work from the series. Others are slower and more meditative.

The work is from a series that explores the generation of complexity from simplicity and is ultimately concerned with the visualisation of the basic underlying nature of the universe (which by its nature must be very simple) and the way that it gives rise to the immense complexity that we see around us.

Complex patterns from simple patterns

Complex patterns generated from simple patterns.

Digital animation. 2015

This work is a relatively slow moving animation that repays close attention. At first you may think that the animation isn’t working, but after three or four seconds you will notice the changes that are occurring to the complex inner structure of the work.
It is composed of overlapping identical grids of hexagons rotating relative to each other.
Simple algorithms make the black and white areas on the grids interact with each other so that, for instance, where black areas overlap they turn white.
The work is deliberately slow to give it a meditative quality. Other works in the same series are faster and give a more dynamic effect.

 

The work is part of a series called In the Beginning that explores the generation of complex patterns from simple patterns or forms as a metaphor for the creation of complexity within the physical universe from what must by definition be extremely simple beginnnings.

Expanding and radiating forms

Expansion I

Digital animation, August 2019.

Contemporary abstract moving image art - expanding radiating cosmic forms
A video still from the work.

Contemporary abstract moving image art - interacting forms
A video still from the work

A work from my series of abstract animations depicting radiating forms expanding outwards from a central point of emergence. The work is linked to my interest in the process of creation on a cosmic scale, such as the creation of the universe at the Big Bang or the expansion of a star or other celestial object.
The work is ideally viewed on a large screen.
This work was exhibited in the London Group gallery, Waterloo, London in December 2019 and the Penwith Gallery, St Ives Cornwall in February 2020.